Are There Still Swiss People in Switzerland?

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Original translation by Nash Montana from Politically Incorrect:

Are there still Swiss people in Switzerland?

Most Germans, including politicians, don’t know a thing about Switzerland. They think of rich people at Zurich’s Bahnhofstrasse, a.k.a. the “Million-Dollar Mile” [That’s slang for the Bahnhofstrasse — translator]. They think of evil bankers with big fat bank vaults for German tax-evaders, they think of hillbilly “Alpöhi” [Heidi’s grandfather in the story “Heidi” — translator], they think of uneducated goat herders like Peter and naïve Heidis, they think of nasty “Schweizermacher”, immigration officials, [The word “Schweizermacher”, “Swissmakers”, is based on an infuriating propaganda “comedy” from 1978 that portrayed two particularly nasty government immigration officials harassing the poor Africans swarming into Switzerland in the ‘70s and ‘80s — translator], and they think of a quixotic population that voted for the ban on minarets.

A small portion of Germans dreams of Swiss citizen-ballot voting. But if only everything were just like that.

The reality is that Swiss banks have long practiced the self-abnegation crawl in front of tax collectors of foreign countries, and that they sell out their clients to blackmailing US administrations or SPD administrations.

The results of citizens’ voting ballots that are disliked are levered out by the elites in politics and justice, they grovel in front of other nations, and they are jubilant when an EU court or some UN organization has the last word. And also there’s no lack of rampaging leftists.

Meanwhile, half of the citizens in Switzerland are now foreigners. Tendency rising. Here’s a few quotations from an article of the WELTWOCHE from Jan 9, 2019:

At the beginning of data acquisition in the year 1926 almost 100% of the 200,000 migrants were reported to possess only Swiss citizenship. 2016 we see a completely different picture: of the 775,000 Swiss citizens who live in another country, 570,000 had one or more passports. That’s a share of about ¾.

Similarly steep is the share of passport holders inside Switzerland; actually it progressed extremely rapidly. In 1996 Switzerland counted 236,000 people with dual citizenship. twenty years later this number has risen to 900,000. This means that dual citizens are the fastest-growing part of the population.

The composition of the population living in Switzerland is therefore being downright plowed up, and even more so when you look at the growth in the numbers of asylum seekers and migrants.

1950 saw 285,000 asylum seekers in Switzerland; in 2016 the number increased to 2.1 million. The absolute number has increased sevenfold since the end of the war. The share of asylum seekers in Switzerland rose from 5% to 25%.

If you add the number of asylum seekers/migrants with dual citizenship (which also comprise 25%) together with the share of asylum seekers/migrants, it becomes painfully clear that the Swiss citizens with simple one-passport citizenship only make up 50% of the entire citizenry of Switzerland.

Germany is not quite there yet, but they are moving in that direction. How will Switzerland digest this development? Many of these asylum seekers/migrants are working. The social state is still able to whitewash these tears in the fabric. Still.

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